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Temporary No Visitor Policy

To protect our patients, families and health care workers during the global outbreak of COVID-19 a temporary no visitor policy has been implemented at KSB Hospital per CDC guidelines.

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Coronavirus Outbreak (COVID-19)

Important information to help you stay healthy and access care when you need it.

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Lovett Center re-opening for in-person bill payments beginning 7/6.

Drive-thru services will no longer be available. Please remember masks are required when visiting any KSB facility.

warning

Temporary No Visitor Policy

To protect our patients, families and health care workers during the global outbreak of COVID-19 a temporary no visitor policy has been implemented at KSB Hospital per CDC guidelines.

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The Pulse – By KSB CEO Dave Schreiner

I love my State Representative. I don’t like the State Government.

I love my Congressman. I’m not a fan of the Federal Government.

I love my physician. Do I love healthcare? Do I hate the healthcare system?

Healthcare, much like politics, is local. We want healthcare to cost less, and we want hospitality-like services, ease of access to care, and technology that simplifies our interactions with our provider.

Health systems across the country are trying to get more people to enter their organization. Whether a rural hospital, like those in the Sauk Valley, is trying to get people to “shop local,” or a regional system, like Mayo Clinic, is luring people to Minnesota, often for care that can be provided right here in the patient’s backyard.

In my role as President/CEO of Katherine Shaw Bethea Hospital, I have a front-row seat to the national health debate. My hope is to interact with readers to discuss and debate access, quality, cost, convenience, technology, and best-in-class care delivered across our nation.

That should keep us busy for a while.

I hope to use this space to create controversy around how we pay for healthcare. Is the cost of our healthcare the responsibility of our government, our employer, or us, the patient?

When admitted to a hospital, should the room look and feel like the patient was dropped into an executive suite at The Four Seasons, or should hospitals go back to double-occupancy rooms?

Is the quality of care provided at large, academic medical centers superior to care provided in rural hospitals (you might be able to guess my response to this one)?

What technology improves patient experience and results in better outcomes? What apps lead to healthier lives?

Should hospitals pay for patient’s air conditioning in their home if that patient suffers from a respiratory illness? Should hospitals be responsible for patient transportation to and from their facility? Should it be the hospital or doctor’s responsibility to maintain the medical record, or should that responsibility lie with the patient?

I hope at least one of these topics has caught your attention. Where do you want to start?

I’m looking forward to the conversation.

David L. Schreiner, FACHE, is the President/CEO of Katherine Shaw Bethea Hospital in Dixon, Illinois. David is a Fellow and past Governor of The American College of Healthcare Executives and currently serves as a member of the American Hospital Association Small or Rural Constituency Section and a doctoral student in Values-Driven Leadership at Benedictine University. He can be reached at David@KSBHospital.com